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    Choice Assistance with summaries of Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management - Cascio & Aguinis - 7th edition

    Choice Assistance with summaries of Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management - Cascio & Aguinis - 7th edition

    Summaries with Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management - Cascio & Aguinis

     

    Booksummary to be used with the 7th edition of Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management

    Online: summary in chapters

    Print: summary in chapters by post

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    • Pickup location: available in JoHo study support center in Amsterdam (address & hours) & The Hague (address & hours)
    • Form: Printed and bundled, A4 format
    • Contents: Dutch and English summary to be used with all chapters, see table of contents
    • Availability: Also available without JoHo membership - for free or with discounts for JoHo members and subscribers

    Content Prints of summaries with Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management

    Booksummary: list of contents for the printed summaries

    • The printed booksummary contains the following chapters:
      • How does applied psychology relate to organizations and work? - Chapter 1
      • How are the law and human resource management linked? - Chapter 2
      • What is the systems approach to people and decisions? - Chapter 3
      • What are relevant measurement criteria in HRM? - Chapter 4
      • What is performance management? - Chapter 5
      • How can we measure and interpret individual differences? - Chapter 6
      • How can we validate and use individual-differences measures? - Chapter 7
      • How does fairness play a role in employment decisions? - Chapter 8
      • How does recruitment work? - Chapter 9
      • How can we analyze jobs and work? - Chapter 10
      • What is strategic workforce planning? - Chapter 11
      • What selection methods exist? Part 1 - Chapter 12
      • What selection methods exist? Part 2 - Chapter 13
      • How does decision making work in selection? - Chapter 14
      • How do we consider research designs in training and development? - Chapter 15
      • How do we implement training and development and measure the outcomes? - Chapter 16
      • What is organizational responsibility and what ethical issues exist in HRM? - Chapter 17
      • What are the international dimensions of applied psychology? - Chapter 18

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    JoHo Worldsupporter.org: summaries with the 6th edition

    Related summaries & other materials with Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management

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    Knowledge & Study pages: summaries per field of study

    How does applied psychology relate to organizations and work? - Chapter 1

    How does applied psychology relate to organizations and work? - Chapter 1

    Organizations are all around us (businesses, hospitals, social clubs etc.) and all have their own particular set of objectives. To function effectively, organizations must subdivide their objectives into various jobs which require people of differing aptitudes. This makes the use of human resources essential. This book considers how applied psychology can contribute to a wiser, more humane use of our human resources.

    How are organizations pervasive?

    We are all confronted by organizations in one form or another in our lives. Children are exposed to school organizations, after leaving school they may choose to join a military, business, or government organization, and will later on probably move through several different organizations. Our everyday lives are intertwined with organizational memberships.

    What characteristics unite various activities under the collective label “organization”? Multiple definitions of organizations have been suggesting, each reflecting various theoretical points of view. But certain fundamental elements recur. In general, an organization is a collection of people working together in a division of labour to achieve a common purpose. Another concept views an organization as a system of inputs (raw materials), throughputs (materials transformed/modified), and outputs (exported/sold back to the environment as finished products). People are the basic ingredients of all organizations.

    The focus is on people as members and resources of organizations and what applied psychology can contribute toward helping organizations make the wisest use of human resources. Personnel psychology concerns individual differences in behaviour and job performance and methods for measuring and predicting such differences. The sources of these differences can come from differences in jobs but also differences in performance and between people.

    A utopian ideal

    In an ideal world, the goal would be to assess everyone’s individual aptitudes, abilities, personalities, and interests; profile these characteristics; then place individuals in jobs perfectly suited to them and society. This ideal falls short in practice.

    Point of view

    It is useful to make explicit underlying assumptions.

    1. In a free society, every individual has a fundamental and inalienable right to compete for any job for which they are qualified.
    2. Society can and should do better at making the wisest and most humane use of its human resources.
    3. Individuals working in human resources and managers responsible for making employment decisions must be as technically competent and well informed as possible.

    What is personnel psychology?

    Personnel psychology is a subfield within I/O (industrial and organizational) psychology. It is an applied discipline focusing on individual differences in behaviour and job performance and methods of measuring and predicting these differences. Major areas of interest include job analysis and job evaluation, recruitment, screening, selection, training and development, and performance management.

    There is also overlap between psychology and HRM, which is concerned with the management of staffing, retention, development, adjustment, and change in order to achieve individual and organizational objectives. Psychologists have already made substantial contributions to the field of human resource management. The last decade has seen changes in markets, technology, organizational designs, and the roles of managers and workers inspiring a renewed emphasis and interest in personnel psychology. The following sections will consider each of these in more detail.

    Changing nature of product and service markets

    Globalization refers to commerce without borders and the interdependence of business operations in different locations. In a world where the transfer of capital, goods, and labor happens seamlessly, globalization brings both positive and negative changes.

    To facilitate globalization, some firms consider outsourcing. They send teams to dissect the workflow of an entire department and then help build a new IT platform, redesign processes, and administer programs. The contractor then disperses work among global networks of staff across the world. These structural changes have consequences that are beneficial for the global economy but promise more frequent career changes for workers.

    It takes trade agreements, technology, capital investment, and infrastructure as well as the skills, and competencies of a well-trained workforce to deliver world-class products and services. Attracting, developing, and retaining talent in a culture that supports ongoing learning is a challenge for all organizations. Human resource professionals are at the center of this effort.

    The psychological contract

    This has an impact on jobs and the psychological contract. Jobs are not being temporarily lost because of a recession, but they are being wiped out permanently as a result of new technology and new ways of organizing work. The final 20 years of the twentieth century saw many corporate cultures and workforces being characterized by downsizing and the loss of the perceived ‘psychological contract’ of lifelong employment with a single employer. The psychological contract refers to an unwritten agreement in which the employee and employer develop expectations about their mutual relationship.

    Stability and predictability characterized the old psychological contract. Change and uncertainty are now hallmarks of the new psychological contract. It Is more common nowadays to job hop and hold multiple jobs during your life than it was a few decades ago.

    Effects of technology on organizations and people

    Millions of workers use many products of the digital age, computers, phones, digital assistants, email etc. Anything digital is borderless and the digital revolution is breaking down departmental barriers, making sharing vast amounts of information easier. To succeed in a world where the only constant thing is the increasing pace of change, companies need motivated, technically literature workers who are willing to train continually.

    Like other new developments, there are negatives and positives associated with new technology, that need to be acknowledged. Negatives include, mass junk email, potential attacks by hackers, and invasion of employees’ privacy. A common assumption is since production and service processes have become more sophisticated, high technology can substitute for skill in a managing workforce. However, technology ideally will help workers make decisions in organizations that encourage them to do so.

    Changes in the structure and design of organizations

    Many factors are driving change, but none are more important than the rise of Internet technologies. The Web enables everyone in an organization to access an array of information instantaneously from anywhere. Organizations these days are global in orientation and all bout speed with no guarantees to workers or managers. Organizations are becoming leaner, with better trained multispecialists. Organizations of the future will come to rely on cross-trained multispecialists. The role of managers is changing dramatically.

    Changing role of the manager

    In the traditional hierarchy, managers ruled by command from the top, using rigid controls to ensure tasks could be coordinated, and partitioned information into compartments. Information was/is power, and managers clung to power by hoarding information and aimed for stability, predictability, and efficiency. In today’s hypercompetitive work environment, organizations have to respond quickly to shifting market conditions. Key tasks for managers are to articulate a vision of what their organizations stand for, what they are trying to accomplish, and how they compete for business in the marketplace.

    A growing number of organizations now recognize that they need to emphasize workplace democracy in order to achieve the vision, which involves breaking down barriers, sharing information, using a collaborative approach to problem solving, and orienting employees toward continuous learning and improvement. This does not necessarily imply a move toward a universal model of organizational and leadership effectiveness. Today’s networked, interdependent, culturally diverse organizations require transformational leadership, which is effective under unstable or uncertain conditions.

    Additionally, much of the work resulting in a product, service, or decision is now done in teams. Such teams have many names – autonomous work groups, process teams, self-managing work teams etc. This all implies a reorientation from the traditional view of a manager’s work. In this environment, workers act more like managers, and managers more like workers. Flattened hierarchies also means that there are fewer managers in the first place.

    The empowered worker

    21st century organizations differ in structure, design, and demographics from those of even a decade ago. Demographically, they are more diverse (more women, more multicultural workers, older workers, more disabled workers, robots etc. here is more pressure to do more with less and emphasis on empowerment, cross-training, personal flexibility, self-management, and continuous learning.

    What are some implications for organizations and their people?

    Today, the quality of a nation’s workforce is a crucial determinant of its ability to compete and win in world markets. Human resources can be sources of sustained competitive advantage if they meet three requirements: (1) they add positive economic benefits to the process of producing goods and services, (2) skills of the workforce are distinguishable from those of competitors, (3) such skills are not easily duplicated. A human resource system can enhance or destroy this potential competitive advantage.

    As personnel psychology moves forward into the 21st century, the biggest challenge is changing the way we think about organizations and their people. There is more demand for comprehensive training policies that focus training efforts on organizational needs 3-5 years out. From an employee’s perspective, these programs are valuable because job security (retaining employment with one organization until retirement) has become less important to workers than employment security (having skills that employers are willing to pay for). Demographic changes are making recruitment and staffing top priorities in many organizations. A diverse workforce is now not something a company should have, but something they all do have or soon will have.

    Aside from demographic changes, there are also changes in the nature of work and its impact on workers and society. Potential problems that could arise include insecurity, uncertainty, stress, and social friction. On the other hand, however, work could provide compensations such as challenge, creativity, flexibility, control, and interrelatedness.

    This all taken together shows that the need for competent HR professionals with broad training in a variety of areas has never been greater than now.

    How are the law and human resource management linked? - Chapter 2

    How are the law and human resource management linked? - Chapter 2

    Comprehensive employment-related legislation, combined with increased motivation from individuals to rectify unfair employment practices, makes the legal aspects of employment one of the more dominant issues in HRM today. All branches of the federal government (in the U.S.) have been actively involved in efforts to guarantee equal employment opportunity as a fundamental individual right, regardless of race, color, age, gender, religion, national origin, or disability. I/O psychologists and HR professionals are being called on to work with attorneys, courts, and federal regulatory agencies. It’s therefore important to understand the rights and obligations of individuals and employers under the law and to ensure that these are translated into everyday practice according to legal guidelines by federal regulatory agencies.

    What is the systems approach to people and decisions? - Chapter 3
    What are relevant measurement criteria in HRM? - Chapter 4

    What are relevant measurement criteria in HRM? - Chapter 4

    Adequate and accurate criterion measurement is a fundamental problem in HRM. Criteria are operational statements of goals or desired outcomes. Although criteria are sometimes used for predictive purposes and sometimes for evaluative purposes, in both cases they represent that which is important or desirable.

    In general, applied psychologists are guided by two principal objectives: (1) to demonstrate the utility of their procedures and programs and (2) to enhance their understanding of the determinants of job success.

    What is performance management? - Chapter 5

    What is performance management? - Chapter 5

    Performance management is a continuous process of identifying, measuring, and developing the performance of individuals and teams and aligning performance with the strategic goals of the organization. It is assessed at regular intervals, and feedback is provided so performance is improved on an ongoing basis. But researchers’ inability to resolve definitively the knotty technical and interpersonal problems of performance appraisal has led to the term the “Achilles’ heel” of HRM. Performance management systems will not be successful if they are not linked to broader work unit and organizational goals. This chapter will focus on both the measurement and the social/motivational aspects of performance management.

    How can we measure and interpret individual differences? - Chapter 6

    How can we measure and interpret individual differences? - Chapter 6

    Measurement of individual differences is the heart of personnel psychology. Individual differences in physical and psychological attributes may be measured on nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio scales. Psychology’s first law is that “People are different.” Physical and psychological variability is all around us.

    How can we validate and use individual-differences measures? - Chapter 7
    How does fairness play a role in employment decisions? - Chapter 8

    How does fairness play a role in employment decisions? - Chapter 8

    Fairness is a social, not a statistical, concept. But when it is technically feasible, users of selection measures should investigate potential bias, which involves examining possible differences in prediction systems for racial, ethnic, and gender subgroups. A complete test bias assessment involves an examination of possible differences in standard errors of estimate and in slopes and intercepts of subgroup regression lines, not just subgroup validity coefficients.

    How does recruitment work? - Chapter 9

    How does recruitment work? - Chapter 9

    Organizations recruit in order to add to, maintain, or readjust their workforces, prior planning is critical to the recruiting process and includes:

    • The establishment of workforce plans.
    • Specification of time.
    • Validation of employment standards.

    The internet is revolutionizing the recruitment process, opening up labour markets and removing geographical constraints. Cost and quality are necessary to evaluate the success of the recruitment effort.

    How can we analyze jobs and work? - Chapter 10

    How can we analyze jobs and work? - Chapter 10

    Despite dramatic changes in the structure of work, individual jobs remain the basic building blocks necessary to achieve broader organizational goals. The objective of job analysis is to define each job in terms of the behaviours necessary to perform it and develop hypothesis about the personal characteristics necessary to perform those behaviours. Job descriptions specify the work to be done. Job specifications indicate the personal characteristics necessary to do the work.

    What is strategic workforce planning? - Chapter 11

    What is strategic workforce planning? - Chapter 11

    People are among any organization’s most critical resources; yet systematic approaches to workforce planning (WP), forecasting, and action programs designed to provide trained people to fill needs for particular skills are still evolving. Ultimate success in WP depends on many factors: the degree of integration of WP with strategic planning activities, the quality of the databases used to produce the talent inventory and forecasts of workforce supply and demand, the calibre of the action programs established, and the organization’s ability to implement the programs.

    What selection methods exist? Part 1 - Chapter 12

    What selection methods exist? Part 1 - Chapter 12

    There are many selection methods available. When selection is done sequentially, the earlier stages often are called screening, which the term selection being reserved for the more intensive final stages. New technological developments now allow for the collection of information using procedures other than the traditional paper pencil. These technologies allow for more flexibility regarding data collection, but also present some unique challenges.

    What selection methods exist? Part 2 - Chapter 13

    What selection methods exist? Part 2 - Chapter 13

    Managerial selection is a topic that deserves separate treatment because of the unique problems associated with describing the components of managerial effectiveness and developing behaviourally based predictor measures to forecast managerial effectiveness accurately. An assortment of data-collection techniques is currently available – cognitive ability tests, objective personality inventories, personal history data, peer ratings – each demonstrating varying degrees of predictive success in particular situations.

    How does decision making work in selection? - Chapter 14

    How does decision making work in selection? - Chapter 14

    If variability in physical and psychological characteristics were not so pervasive a phenomenon, there would be little need for selection of people to fill jobs. Without variability in abilities, aptitudes, interests, and personality traits, we’d forecast identical levels of job performance for all job applicants. In personnel selection decisions are made about individuals and are concerned with the assignment of individuals to courses of action whose outcomes are important to the institutions or individuals involved.

    How do we consider research designs in training and development? - Chapter 15

    How do we consider research designs in training and development? - Chapter 15

    Training and development imply changes – change sin skill, knowledge, attitude, or social behaviour. Although there are many strategies for effecting changes, training and development are common and important ones. Various theoretical models can help guide training and development efforts. These include the individual differences model, principles of learning and transfer, motivation theory, goal setting, and behaviour modelling. Each offers a systematic approach to training and development, and each emphasizes a different aspect of the training process.

    How do we implement training and development and measure the outcomes? - Chapter 16

    How do we implement training and development and measure the outcomes? - Chapter 16

    The literature on training and development techniques is massive. Generally, however, it falls into three categories: information-presentation techniques, simulation methods, and on-the-job training. Selecting a technique will yield maximal payoff when designers of training follow a two-step sequence: first, specify clearly what is to be learned; then choose a specific method or technique that matches training requirements. When measuring training and development outcomes, be sure to include:

    1. Provision for saying something about the practical and theoretical significance of the results.
    2. A logical analysis of the process and content of the training.
    3. Some effort to deal with the ‘systems’ aspects of training impact.
    What is organizational responsibility and what ethical issues exist in HRM? - Chapter 17

    What is organizational responsibility and what ethical issues exist in HRM? - Chapter 17

    Organizational responsibility (OR) is defined as context-specific organizational actions and policies that take into account stakeholders’ expectations and the triple bottom line of economic, social, and environmental performance. The challenge of being responsible and ethical in managing people does not lie in the mechanical application of moral prescriptions. It is found in the process of creating and maintaining genuine relationships from which to address ethical dilemmas that cannot be covered by prescription. One’s personal values play an important part in this process.

    What are the international dimensions of applied psychology? - Chapter 18

    What are the international dimensions of applied psychology? - Chapter 18

    Globalization is a fact of modern organizational life, it refers to commerce without borders, along with the interdependence of business operations in different locations. This chapters emphasizes five main areas:

    1. Identification of potential for international management.
    2. Selection for international assignments.
    3. Cross-cultural training and development.
    4. Performance management.
    5. Repatriation.

    Though the behavioural implications of globalization can be addressed from various perspectives, we choose to focus only on five of them.

    Printed summary of Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management - Cascio & Aguinis - 7th edition
    De crossroads van deze bundel
    Study Bundle Specialisation Work and Organisational Psychology - UvA
    Advice & Summaries Specialisation Work & Organisational Psychology - UvA
    Choice Assistance with summaries of Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management - Cascio & Aguinis - 7th edition
    Choice Assistance with summaries of Discovering Statistics Using IBM SPSS Statistics - Field - 5th edition
    Keuzewijzer voor samenvattingen van Group Performance - Nijstad - 1e druk
    Keuzewijzer voor samenvattingen van An Introduction to Contemporary Work Psychology - Peeters et al. - 1e druk
    Keuzewijzer voor samenvattingen van Real World Research van Robson - 3e druk
    Choice assistance with summaries of Writing Psychology Research Reports - Starreveld - 1st edition
    Keuzewijzer voor samenvattingen van Leadership in Organizations - Yukl - 8e druk
    Subscriber bundle with online chaptersummaries of Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management - Cascio & Aguinis - 7th edition
    Subscriber bundle with online chapter summaries of Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS Statistics - Field - 5th edition
    Abonneebundel met online chaptersamenvattingen van Group Performance - Nijstad - 1e druk
    Abonneebundel met online chaptersamenvattingen van An Introduction to Contemporary Work Psychology - Peeters et al. - 1e druk
    Subscriber Bundle with online chapter summaries of Writing Psychology Research Reports - Starreveld - 1st edition
    Abonneebundel met online chaptersamenvattingen van Leadership in Organizations - Yukl - 8e druk
    Shop Bundle with printed summaries for Work and Organisational Psychology - UvA
    Summary Shop Psychology Bachelor 3 & Masters - UvA
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